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Handgun Reviews

Kimber Centennial Edition 1911

by Patrick Sweeney   |  September 24th, 2010 0


You want something to remember the 21st century by? Then hike on down to your gunshop and get in line for the Kimber Centennial Edition of the 1911. The Centennial Edition is built on a Government frame, in .45 ACP (what else?)

The frame is color case-hardened, the slide blued and engraved, and the grips are smooth ivory. And the blue? Oh, the blue. The slide is done in a charcoal blue, while the hammer and sear pins, as well as the trigger, are done in a nitre blue.

The charcoal blue is a deeper color than the oxide black we see today, while the nitre blue of steel creates a blue that almost glows in the dark. The color case-hardening means that each frame, besides having a unique serial number, has a unique color pattern.

The grip screws are Allen head and also given a charcoal blue. The pistols are hand-assembled by Kimber armorers and then turned over to Doug Turnbull for the bluing and color case-hardening before final assembly.

The slide bears a Kimber adjustable rear sight, while the front is a dovetailed installation, so you need not worry about durability if you take this out of its fitted case to shoot it. If you do shoot it, you’ll find that each has been hand-fitted with a match Kimber barrel and bushing, carefully blued to match the slide, and fitted as if it were to be used as a match gun, not just a presentation piece.

The case is wood and leather, with a brass plate and maker’s label. The fitted interior is done in green velvet, and each Centennial Edition will have a special serial number prefix: MMXX. They will be produced in a limited number, only 250 total.

If you have $4,352 burning a hole in your pocket, don’t wait. If you end up being number 251 in line, you’ll have to pry one away from someone who was faster on the trigger than you were.

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